Cornwall Football Golf

Cornwall Football Golf

FootballGolf uses the same rules as golf but instead of using a club players kick a football into a hole. There are hazards and obstacles along the way helping make the game fun and enjoyable for everyone. The game of FootballGolf is suitable for anyone 5 years old to 80 years old. We have have two courses to suit all ages and abilities. One on level ground called Parkland and one on the hills called Hillside. So if you enjoy the outdoors then come and try this brand new fun game.
A great Family day out
Fun for all ages
Excellent for team building, groups and parties.
Centrally located in Cornwall – Only 5 minutes from Eden Project
Clubhouse serving snacks and drinks.
No need to book just turn up and play.
Play area for Under 5’s
It takes a group of 4 around 2 hrs to complete 18 holes
Spectacular surroundings & views
Free Parking & well behaved dogs kept on a lead more than welcome

PL25 3GD
Contact: 01726 68952      https://cornwallfootballgolf.co.uk/ 

Marazion to Penzance Cycle Footpath

Marazion to Penzance Cycle Footpath – Marazion to Penzance Cycle Footpath

An easy walk from Penzance (or Marazion) that gives great views across Mounts Bay to St Michael’s Mount, the Lizard and Mousehole. It is especially good in autumn, when the Bird Reserve at Marazion attracts rare migrants such as bitterns and water rails, and the flocks of swallows hunting flying ants sometimes draw the attention of a passing hobby, an unusual bird of prey.

This walk is particularly good for dogs as it passes a beach and pubs where dogs are welcome. Have a look at our Top Dog Walks on the South West Coast Path for more dog friendly beaches and pubs.

The Camel Trail

The Camel Trail

Running through both a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and a Special Area of Conservation (SAC) the Camel Trail is an 18 mile largely traffic free, surfaced and virtually level multi use trail which passes through some of the most spectacular countryside in the south west.

Following the disused railway line once used by the London and South West Railway, cyclists hug the Camel Estuary from Padstow to Wadebridge before joining the route through the deeply incised and beautifully wooded Camel Valley to Bodmin. At Bodmin yet another line, one of the most historic in the country, winds its way inland to the foot of Bodmin Moor where it comes to an end near Blisland, an extraordinarily pretty moorland village.

Landscape and wildlife designations abound, contrasts in scenery are striking and access to country and seaside towns provide opportunities to use local shops, pubs and visit attractions. Visitors can easily hire bikes in Padstow, Wadebridge, Bodmin as well as at Wenfordbridge which is at the other end of the trail where there is also free parking and public toilets at Snail’s Pace cafe & Bike hire. The trail provides access in to the heart of North Cornwall, experienced cyclists can make off, away from the trail exploring the many villages and country lanes which lie close to the trail.

https://www.visitcornwall.com/things-to-do/cycling/north-coast/padstow/camel-trail       Satnav: PL31 2RD

Coastal Footpaths

Coastal Footpaths

Cornwall is surrounded by coastline on 3 sides. Public Coastal Footpaths can be accessed, from any harbour village, town or port, in the county.

There are various levels of hiking available to enjoy, from flat walkways and cycle paths at Marazion, to rough terrain and moors at Bodmin, why not experience Cornwall, at natures best!

Some great places to start at, include:

  • Marazion to Penzance
  • Praa Sands to Porthleven
  • Mousehole to Sennen
  • St Just to St Ives
  • Hayle to Portreath
  • Porthcothan – Padstow
  • Charlestown to Gorran Haven
  • to name a few….

Bodmin Moor

Bodmin Moor

Bodmin Moor, one of Cornwall’s designated Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, is a remote, bleak heather covered upland granite moorland still grazed by moorland ponies and bisected by the main A30 road.

North of the A30 lie Cornwall’s two highest peaks, Rough Torand the slightly taller Brown Willy, which reaches a height of 420 metres (1,377 ft) above sea level. More than a hundred Bronze Age hut circles have been excavated on the slopes of Rough Tor, along with a Neolithic Tor Enclosure and the foundations of a Medieval chapel. The wild and windswept ’high moor’ is also home to Cornwall’s highest church, located in the village of St Breward, starting point of the Camel Trail.

Manor Common, near the attractive village of Blisland, was first recorded in the Domesday Book and the area is home to a couple of Cornwall’s more interesting stone circles, the Trippet Stones and the Stripple Stones Henge, as well as the ten foot high Jubilee Rock and a peculiar arrangement of stones known as King Arthur’s Hall.

Bodmin Moor was densely populated during the Bronze Age and numerous fascinating archaelogical remains have been uncovered, including impressive Bronze Age cairns on the slopes of Brown Gelly, the remains of more than fifty Neolithic hut circles on Leskernick Hill, and the impressive Trethevy Quoit, near the village of Minions. Minions is close to numerous other places of interest including Rillaton Barrow, the famous Hurlers stone circles, Daniel Gumb’s Cave, and The Cheesewring, a striking wind eroded formation of circular granite rocks balanced on top of each other said to be the result of an epic struggle between the giants and the saints.

https://www.cornwalls.co.uk/Bodmin/bodmin_moor.htm       Satnav: PL14 5LE

Prideaux Place

Prideaux Place

Living history on the beautiful North Cornish coast. Since its completion in 1592 the same family have lived in this charming Elizabethan manor. Take a tour of the house or stroll in the tranquil grounds overlooking the ancient deer park.

Apart from the appeal of its architecture, notably a remarkable plaster ceiling, and the glorious views across its ancient deer park to the distant outlines of Brown Willy and Roughtor on Bodmin Moor, Prideaux Place is much prized as  an Elizabethan manor house still lived in by the family for whom it was built.

The Prideaux family acquired the estate, previously owned by the Prior of Bodmin, at the time of the Dissolution of the Monastries. The present house was completed in 1592 by Sir Nicholas Prideaux. Two major additions have been made to the house, first in the 17th century by Edmund Prideaux on his return from the Grand Tour and later by the Rev Charles Prideaux who was much influenced by Strawberry Hill Gothic.

Having survived the Elizabethan, Georgian and Victorian eras, today’s exciting restoration programme aims to return these beautiful gardens to their former glory. Now with the help and advice of Tom Petherick, who was an integral part of the restoration of the Lost Gardens of Heligan, much clearing and new planting has been undertaken.

http://prideauxplace.co.uk/  Phone: 01841 532411    Satnav: PL28 8RP

Trerice House and Gardens

Trerice House and Gardens

Today the renowned stillness and tranquility of Trerice, much prized by visitors, is occasionally pierced by the curious lilts of Tudor music or shouts of excitement from the Bowling Green (surely you will want to try a game of kayling), bringing back some of the bustle and noise that must have typified its time as a busy manor house.

Don’t miss

* Handle replica artefacts and armour and make a brass rubbing.
* Discover the beautiful architecture and fine plaster ceilings.
* Enjoy the tranquillity of the informal garden and Cornish orchard.

Making the most of your day
Look out for Tudor-themed family and adult workshops, family trails and special Living History days.

https://www.visitcornwall.com/things-to-do/gardens/north-coast/newquay/trerice-house-and-gardens

Phone: 01637 875404     Satnav:  TR8 4PG

Pencarrow House and Gardens

Pencarrow House and Gardens

Pencarrow House and Gardens lies at the foot of a sweeping valley between Bodmin and Wadebridge in Cornwall. The largely Georgian mansion is still owned and occupied by descendants of the family who settled there in the 1500s. Open to the public since the 1970s, Pencarrow House and Gardens is a great day out for families, history enthusiasts, nature and garden lovers, and of course the dogs. The family members are very involved with events and day-to-day management of the estate, as they face the ever-changing challenge of maintaining a historic home in the 21st century.

Come and experience Cornish history still in the making, and all very welcome.

Pencarrow, whose name in Cornish means “head of the valley” or “high fort”, obviously occupies a favourable site – the Iron Age hill fort now bisected by the main drive attests that man was long ago attracted to its location and climate. Some form of large house stood on Pencarrow’s present site for centuries.

Pencarrow’s gardens are a combination of formal landscaping and woodland walks, with attractive planting for both garden specialists and casual walkers. Shorter and longer walking loops are available, as well as some wheelchair access. After the Snowdrop Sundays in February, Pencarrow’s floral season begins in March with a dazzling display of camellias and rhododendrons (more than 600 varieties in total) which bloom through the spring. Bluebells and Wild Garlic carpet the woods in May/June; the Memorial Garden provides a summer display, followed by hydrangeas, fuchsias and azaleas into the autumn.

https://www.pencarrow.co.uk/   Phone: 01208 841369    Satnav: PL30 3AG

Tremenheere Sculpture Gardens

Tremenheere Sculpture Gardens

A beautiful sheltered valley in west Cornwall, surrounded by woods, streams and dramatic vista provides the perfect setting for this 22-acre exotic and sub-tropical garden. International renowned artists such as James Turrell and David Nash RA have interacted with the garden to create site-specific permanent works, all harmonising with their garden setting.

The Café serves fabulous freshly prepared homemade meals, snacks & drinks throughout the day using the best locally sourced seasonal produce.

Join us for a morning cuppa, delicious lunch or light snack, or how about a traditional afternoon tea in our beautiful surroundings with splendid views of the bay.

We are fully licensed and stock a great selection of wines, beers & ciders.

The garden consists of 41,000 pieces of slate arranged in a subtly layered arc in a sunken dale surrounded by a majestic weeping willow and old characterful shaped trees. Dappled woodland light, the sounds of burbling water and views across the pond create a magical and restful backdrop. A monolith that was part of the original garden at Chelsea can also be found located outside the restaurant building as visitors arrive at Tremenheere. Originally designed for the RHS Chelsea Flower Show in 2015, it was awarded a gold medal during that years show and was sponsored by Brewin Dolphin.

http://www.tremenheere.co.uk/   Phone: 01736 448089      Satnav: TR20 8YL

Trewidden Gardens

Trewidden Gardens

I am delighted to welcome you to Trewidden Garden, one of the Great Gardens of Cornwall.

Originally planted by my relative Thomas Bolitho in the 19th Century, the 15 acre garden incorporates a magnificent collection of over 300 Camellias and Magnolias alongside one of the largest tree fern dells in Europe and many other attractions.

The maze of informal paths leads you around this peaceful Cornish garden with champion trees and shrubs, many of which are over 100 years old, to be discovered alongside some species of plants rarely seen grown in this country.We also have our new Trewidden Trail in the Garden designed so children also enjoy their visit to the Garden, interesting plants for sale along with Cornish cream teas and other locally produced items available to tantalise you in our Tearoom and shop – please do pop in. I very much hope you enjoy Trewidden Garden as much as I do. Have fun!

http://trewiddengarden.co.uk/    Phone:  01736 364275      TR20 8TT